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HI Robin, thanks for your suggestion. I agree, including examples would have been very helpful. In ongoing podcasts I will add musical examples to make it clearer what I am talking about.

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Who was the critic with perfect pitch who read the score? Might you have a reference for that?

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Hi Roger. Interesting. Since I do not know how to identify the various types of composition you reference in your podcast (ie atonal, chromatic, etc) it would be helpful if you played a few minutes of a piece that is highly representative of these types of composition when you reference them. I would be particularly interested in the difference between compositions that are considered "atonal" vs those that simply contain discordant notes. (You say that all classical music has discordant notes but that the public has become averse to any discordance in music. Perhaps an example?) Thanks.

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Roger Rudenstein

just now

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HI Robin, thanks for your suggestion. I agree, including examples would have been very helpful. In ongoing podcasts I will add musical examples to make it clearer what I am talking about.

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Hi Cory, The point I'm trying to make in "What Happened to Classical Music - Part 2" is that the commercialization of music has fundamentally destroyed our culture making a golden calf the goal of aspiring artists and preventing art from being judged on its merit since the major factor for the judges is "How much profit will it make us?"

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